The New ICA San Francisco Opens Its Doors With an Artist-Curated Show About Black Women and Freedom

Robert Hundley

The Bay Area’s newest institution, the ICA San Francisco, celebrated the closing period of its opening previous evening, unveiling its most significant gallery room with a persuasive group clearly show on the value of celebrating Black natural beauty, relaxation, and self expression, curated by California artists Tahirah Rasheed and Autumn Breon.

Titled “Resting Our Eyes,” the exhibition capabilities performs from both equally large names and growing stars, with impressive financial loans by the likes of Carrie Mae Weems, Derrick Adams, Sadie Barnette, Genevieve Gaignard, and Simone Leigh.

Breon, who life in Los Angeles, and Rasheed, who is from Oakland, fulfilled by way of the For Freedoms artist collective. (Group cofounder Hank Willis Thomas is amid the artists highlighted in the display, alongside with his mother, photographer Deborah Willis.)

“So numerous individuals within the community just held on assuming that we realized each other,” Breon informed Artnet Information at the exhibition’s opening reception. When they have been lastly introduced, the link was prompt.

Curators Tahirah Rasheed and Autumn Breon at “Resting Our Eyes” at the ICA San Francisco. Photograph by Vikram Valluri for BFA.

The two have invested the past yr curating “Resting Our Eyes,” which offers a taste of founding ICA director Alison Gass’s socially minded vision for the institution, which appears to be like to concentration on beneath-represented voices in the artwork world.

The show’s topic was motivated by the Combahee River Collective, a team of Black feminists who started meeting in 1974.

“Basically the thought is that if and when black females are absolutely free, everyone else in the earth will inevitably be no cost, due to the fact the devices that oppress black ladies would have to be dismantled and everyone else would advantage from it,” Breon stated.

“When T and I began wondering about the mechanisms for independence, we held heading back again to leisure and adornment,” she extra. “We were hunting for the artwork that tells the tale how we adorn ourselves and how we prioritize relaxation, for the reason that we see each of people as seriously necessary acts.”

See some of the will work from the exhibit below.

Adana Tillman, <em>Wild Things</em> (2020). Photo courtesy of the artist.

Adana Tillman, Wild Things (2020). Image courtesy of the artist.

Gaignard, <em>Look What We've Become</em> (2020). Collection of Bob Rennie, Vancouver. Photo by Jeff Mclane, courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter, Los Angeles.

Gaignard, Appear What We’ve Turn into (2020). Assortment of Bob Rennie, Vancouver. Image by Jeff Mclane, courtesy of the artist and Vielmetter, Los Angeles.

Sadie Barnette, <em>Easy in the Den</em> (2019). Photo courtesy of the artist and Jessica Silverman, San Francisco.

Sadie Barnette, Straightforward in the Den (2019).
Photograph courtesy of the artist and Jessica Silverman, San Francisco.

Hank Willis Thomas, <em>Kama Mama, Kama Binti (Like Mother, Like Daughter)</em> (1971/2008) from "Unbranded: Reflections in Black by Corporate America." Collection of the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation. Photo by Aaron Wessling Photography.

Hank Willis Thomas, Kama Mama, Kama Binti (Like Mom, Like Daughter) (1971/2008) from “Unbranded: Reflections in Black by
Corporate The usa.” Selection of the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation. Photograph by Aaron Wessling Pictures.

Carrie Mae Weems, <em>The Blues</em> (2017). Collection of Jeffrey N. Dauber and Marc A. Levin. Courtesy of the Dauber/Levin Collection.

Carrie Mae Weems, The Blues (2017). Selection of Jeffrey N. Dauber and Marc A. Levin. Courtesy of the Dauber/Levin Assortment.

Lauren Halsey, <em>Untitled</em> (2021). Photo by Allen Chen, courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles.

Lauren Halsey, Untitled (2021). Photograph by Allen Chen, courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles.

Traci Bartlow, <em>Girl Boss</em> (1996). Photo courtesy of the artist.

Traci Bartlow, Lady Boss (1996). Picture courtesy of the artist.

Helina Metaferia, <em>Headdress 1</em> (2019). Photo courtesy of the artist.

Helina Metaferia, Headdress 1 (2019). Photograph courtesy of the artist.

Carrie Mae Weems, <em>The Blues</em> (2017). Collection of Jeffrey N. Dauber and Marc A. Levin. Photo courtesy of the Dauber/Levin Collection.

Carrie Mae Weems, The Blues (2017). Assortment of Jeffrey N. Dauber and Marc A. Levin. Photo courtesy of the Dauber/Levin Assortment.

Ebony G. Patterson, <em>...they wondered what to do...for those who bear/bare witness</em> (2018). Photo courtesy of the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago.

Ebony G. Patterson, …they wondered what to do…for individuals who bear/bare witness
(2018). Picture courtesy of the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago.

Deborah Willis, <em>Carrie at the Euro Salon, Eatonville</em> (2010). Photo courtesy of the artist and Rena Bransten Gallery, San Francisco.

Deborah Willis, Carrie at the Euro Salon, Eatonville (2010). Photograph courtesy of the artist and Rena Bransten Gallery, San Francisco.

Resting Our Eyes” is on check out at the Institute of Present-day Art San Francisco, 901 Minnesota Street, San Francisco, January 21–June 25, 2023. 

Abide by Artnet Information on Fb:


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